As drought worsens, can Kenyan communities coexist with native wildlife?

As drought worsens, can Kenyan communities coexist with native wildlife?

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Wajir County, KenyaThe men sitting inside the open-backed safari truck were silent and tense as they pulled up alongside their target. A young male giraffe stood under the shade of a tall tree, seeking relief from the unusually brutal March sun. As he heard the tires roll over dry thorn bushes, he craned his long neck and perked up his ears. 

The man in the passenger seat aimed his gun and pulled the trigger, hitting the giraffe squarely in the flank. The group let out a hushed cheer as the animal flinched. 

A man in the backseat set the timer on his watch. “Seven minutes until he falls,” he whispered. 

The giraffe wobbled drunkenly and then took off, loping into an open clearing. A six-foot log attached to his back foot by electrical wire dragged behind him. The men—a team of veterinarians from the government and a conservation nonprofit—were there to sedate him and remove the snare, set by poachers. If they didn’t, human or animal predators likely would kill the giraffe that night.

The team sprinted after the giraffe and lassoed his legs, and he crashed down on his side. One veterinarian crouched by the giraffe’s head and held it down, covering the animal’s large brown eyes and long feathery eyelashes with a towel. The other vet used bolt cutters to snap the electrical wire. As they worked, men from a nearby village encircled them, pouring cool water on the giraffe’s body to protect him from the heat.

It was over in minutes. The veterinarians administered the antidote to the tranquilizer and shouted for the crowd to clear. They pushed the giraffe’s head up and helped him stand. He looked around, as if surprised to see so many people milling around him. Then he lumbered over to a nearby tree, raised his head, and began to eat. 

During the past 35 years, the number of reticulated giraffes, which today live almost exclusively in northern Kenya, has dropped from 36,000 to fewer than 16,000—a 56 percent decline. The species was classified as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature in 2018. The giraffes have died in huge numbers, largely because of decades of tribal conflicts over land and resources, violence by the Somalia-based terrorist group al-Shabaab, and, perhaps most urgent, from climate change, which has accelerated habitat loss and increased poaching in the region. 

The Horn of Africa has endured three consecutive seasons of scant rainfall that have been linked to climate change. One more poor rainy season will make this the longest drought the region has experienced in four decades. Some 20 million people are in need of urgent food aid as crops fail and livestock die. Climate experts say that even an average rainy season wouldn’t be enough to undo the damage of the past few years.

“Drought is a slow-onset disaster that creeps in slowly but has serious impact,” says Jully Ouma, a climate scientist at Igad Climate Prediction and Applications Center in Nairobi. “It takes time to recover.”

Today, the northeastern counties of Garissa, Wajir, and Mandera are covered in red dust. The bushes and trees are dead. And the air smells like rotting flesh from the carcasses of goats, camels, and donkeys that have collapsed along roadsides from starvation and thirst. 

Drought doesn’t discriminate between livestock and wildlife. But in many ways, wild animals are far more vulnerable to its effects than their domesticated cousins. “For the livestock, humans can move with them and direct them to where they think pasture and water are, but the wildlife have to survive on their own,” Ouma says.  

Climate change is hitting the region’s wild animals on several fronts. It’s exacerbating human-wildlife conflict and habitat destruction, as traditionally nomadic pastoralists lose their livestock and settle in what was once wildlife habitat. It’s ramping up poaching, as locals and refugees kill animals to eliminate competition for scarce resources, feed themselves and their families, or sell their meat for a small income. And it’s also affecting wildlife directly, as animals simply drop dead from the extreme, unyielding heat and lack of food and water. 

Local wildlife activists are creating community-based conservancies across northeast Kenya to protect its unique species, including the reticulated giraffe, the critically endangered hirola antelope, the endangered Grevy’s zebra, and the blue-necked Somali ostrich. But without large-scale interventions to stem the destruction of climate change, future generations may never have the opportunity to live among these rare animals. 

The birth of NECA 

In 2011, 48-year-old Sharmake Yussuf was driving down the M1 highway from London to Sheffield when he received a call from his stepmother in Wajir County, Kenya. 

Yussuf, a Kenyan-Somali who had been working as a systems engineer in the United Kingdom for 20 years, had bought some camels, highly valued in Somali culture, several months earlier. Yussuf’s stepmother informed him that a lion had killed and eaten one of his prized animals. Bad luck, Yussuf thought to himself before putting the incident out of his mind. 

On his drive back to London the next day, Yussuf’s stepmother called back. She had poisoned the carcass of the camel, she told him proudly, and the lion had died an agonizing death when it returned to finish its meal. Yussuf was furious. To him, the lion was far more precious than the camel. But revenge killings have always been a part of Somali pastoralist culture—a way of ensuring that predators such as lions, hyenas, and cheetahs stick to eating wild animals and don’t develop a taste for livestock. 

“It dawned on me how my community looks at wildlife, and I made a decision there and then to try to do something within my community to change how they view conservation,” Yussuf says. He returned to Kenya a few months later and realized just how few conservancies and reserves there were in the northeast. Even the veterinarians who came to rescue the young male giraffe were brought in from Nairobi, over 200 miles away, and Meru, about 140 miles away.

Northeast Kenya, long viewed by Nairobi as a rogue and troublesome region, has seen relatively little government investment in infrastructure and development since its independence from British colonial rule in 1963. This has made communities there especially vulnerable to the effects of drought and increased competition for scarce resources, damaging the once-peaceful relationship between humans and wildlife. 

Regional instability also meant that the northeast was widely believed to have minimal wildlife. But in 2021, during Kenya’s first-ever national wildlife census, air pilots surveying Garissa, Wajir, and Mandera counties discovered 6,000 reticulated giraffes, more than a third of the world’s remaining population, 302 Grevy’s zebras, and 141 lions.

Yussuf was determined to find a way to help people thrive alongside this wildlife, rather than see them as a threat. He turned to community-based conservation, considered one of the soundest forms of protection. The land that professional rangers are responsible for patrolling is far too vast to have eyes everywhere. So, when the community unites around wildlife protection, it can be particularly effective. Communities set aside land for wild animals, and in return, specific grazing areas are designated for livestock. The presence of abundant wildlife also promises income from foreign tourists. 

Persuading communities to share their land with wildlife, however, isn’t easy. Pastoralists often are afraid that conservation will mean higher numbers of predators that threaten their livestock, and that fencing off certain areas will prevent them from grazing their cows, goats, and camels there. Access to grazing lands historically has been a heated point of debate between pastoralists and conservationists.

Yussuf, broad-shouldered and crisply dressed even in the most withering heat, has a bright smile and inexhaustible energy for advocating for wildlife protection in the Somali community. For seven years, he engaged community elders and imams, local government officials, and residents about their responsibility to care for these animals. There would have been no point moving forward without their blessing.

“I went one village at a time, one tribe at a time, one subclan at a time,” he says.  

His persistence paid off, and in 2018 he formed Sabuli Conservancy, 510,000 acres now protected by 30 conservancy rangers. Last year, Yussuf founded the North-Eastern Conservancies Association (NECA), an umbrella organization that unites Sabuli and seven other conservancies spanning nearly two million acres. Another 18 conservancies have been proposed, which would bring the total area of protected land to five million acres. 

Challenges to animals, and to a way of life

Just outside the town of Garissa, homes are popping up on either side of the main road. Kenya’s population has grown nearly sevenfold since the 1960s, and as droughts hit with increasing frequency and intensity, nomadic pastoralists are giving up their traditional way of life and settling in villages. 

Every evening, as the sun sets over the Tana River, giraffes travel from their grazing land in the east across the main road to drink. What was once a traditional migration corridor is now blocked by high concrete walls, and the giraffes walk from plot to plot searching for an opening. When they find one, they rush across the road in groups, wary of speeding cars and motorcycles. 

“During the day, they give a chance to humans to use the river, and they move away,” says National Geographic Explorer Abdullahi Ali, a Garissa-born conservation scientist specializing in reticulated giraffes and hirolas. “In the evening, they have to come back.” (Ali won National Geographic/Buffett Awards for Leadership in Conservation in 2021.)

Ali worries that one day this entire area will be fenced in, and giraffes will be pushed out of their ancestral home altogether. 

“That would be a huge catastrophe. Can you imagine a world without giraffes?” he asks. 

The Tana River provides irrigation for a few farms near Garissa that grow beans, mangos, and other crops that are lifelines for local people. As the drought has intensified, the giraffes have started venturing into these farms at night, braving the possibility of human interaction to find water. They trample the crops, which has prompted the farmers to begin patrolling their fields carrying machetes and broken bottles. When they encounter an unsuspecting, thirsty giraffe, they slash its legs. 

“Either you take care of the giraffes, or we will,” says 45-year-old Habiba Bilow, warning the conservationists. She is considering giving up her farm because of the destruction caused by giraffes.

The Kenya Wildlife Service compensates pastoralists when they lose their animals to predators, but some people wait years to see the money. In the meantime, they find other ways of seeking retribution. Last year in Sabuli, a lion killed two lactating cows, prompting angry local residents to poison one of the carcasses. When the lion returned to finish its meal the next day, it went blind, and the town stoned it to death. 

Incidents like these are also responsible for the death of vultures and scavenging birds, which clean up the remains of other animals’ kills. Today, most of these birds have been killed in secondhand poisonings. The skies are empty. 

Poaching 

Yussuf is in Garissa in March when he receives word that poachers have turned up in Sabuli Conservancy. It’s about an hour’s drive from Dadaab refugee camp, which hosts more than 218,000 mostly Somali refugees who have fled conflict, drought, and famine in their country. Young refugees here have few ways other than hunting and collecting firewood to support themselves and their families. 

Yussuf estimates that 63 giraffes were killed by poachers across the northeast in 2021. Over a five day period  in March 2022, refugees killed three giraffes in and around Sabuli, likely to sell the meat in butcher stalls in the camp and across the border in Somalia.

Some refugees also bring donkey caravans into the protected areas to forage for firewood to sell. The journey by foot takes nearly a week, and they often hunt dik-dik and other small game to eat during their journey.

Yussuf has organized a poaching patrol with rangers from the Kenya Wildlife Service in Wajir, local police, and Sabuli’s community rangers. Armed and ready, the caravan of vehicles sets off, traveling on dusty rough roads that turn into narrow winding paths. Eventually, they come upon a group of seven young men relaxing under a tree, seeking respite from the 100-degree heat. Each one has a donkey cart piled ten feet high with firewood. 

The rangers jump out of the car and round up the young men, shouting threats in their faces. They search each man and discover several sharp, serrated hunting knives and a food sack covered in blood. Just down the road they find the spindly, fragile legs of a mostly eaten dik-dik. 

The rangers consider burning all the firewood to teach the young men a lesson but decide against it. The dry conditions could cause uncontrollable wildfires. Instead, they knock down the carts, spilling the contents of five days of labor onto the ground. When the rangers are gone, the refugees will pick up each log and place it back in the carts. They have rented these carts from businessmen in Dadaab and cannot risk showing up empty-handed. 

Dropping dead

Ali Gedi, a 50-year-old goat herder and father of 10, remembers the days before climate change ravaged this land. 

“I used to see elephants as a child,” he recalls. 

But the elephants left northeast Kenya long ago, driven out by poaching and habitat destruction, and local residents have suffered from their loss. The elephants used to trample the brush with their massive flat feet, creating grasslands where goats and antelopes could graze side by side. 

“We lost a lot of benefits when the elephants left,” Gedi says. “We won’t allow the same thing to happen to the giraffes.”

Gedi is from Eyrib, a town outside Wajir that depends on several large reservoirs built by the government back in the 1980s. But in the final months of 2021, most nearly dried up because of the drought. Since then, giraffes, unable to find any other water, travel to drink from the small muddy puddles still left in the center of the huge reservoirs. 

Kenya Wildlife Service rangers received the call in November of last year. Seven giraffes were stuck in the reservoir mud. Some were already dead, while others were too weak to pull themselves out. Rangers raced to the scene, but the remaining animals, frightened and in pain, died before they arrived.  

Rangers hitched the dead giraffes to trucks and dragged their corpses out of the mud to prevent water contamination. They laid their bodies in a circle, a public statement about what climate change will do to the world’s wildlife unless humans take fast action.

In total, more than 215 giraffes across the region died from drought between August 2021 and January of this year, Yussuf estimates. 

Some 30 hirola also died during that drought. Only about 500 of these shy and sensitive creatures remain in the world, so the deaths represented nearly six percent of the total population. 

“Nobody knows about the plight of the hirola,” says Ali, the world’s foremost expert on the hirola. “If they’re not charismatic, they’re not bringing money to the government through tourism, so no one will care.” 

There have been some successful efforts by conservationists and the government to mitigate the damage being caused by climate change. Last September, three poachers were arrested with two cars full of giraffe meat as they headed to the Somali border crossing. They received a fast-tracked trial in Wajir, and two of them were sentenced to six years in prison, three years longer than the required sentence. For Yussuf, the verdict was a welcome one as he continues to fight on behalf of the wild animals who cannot fight for themselves. 

The day before he flies back to Nairobi, Yussuf meets with three men from other parts of Wajir county who want to start new conservancies. Jima Conservancy has been established as a community-based organization in the eastern part of the county, and the men are working to include it under the NECA umbrella. Yussuf sits with them for nearly two hours, talking them through each step they must take to successfully protect their land and the animals within. 

“If you’re doing this for money, there’s no money,” Yussuf tells them. “We are doing this for future generations.” 

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The giraffe, weak from lack of food and water, died after it got stuck in mud as as it tried to find water in the nearly dried-up reservoir. The giraffe is moved to prevent contamination of the reservoir water.”,”ext”:”jpg”}},”hideEndBug”:true,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showDownArrow”:false,”ctaLinkDisplay”:”textLink”,”description”:”As prolonged drought plagues the Horn of Africa, some people perceive animals as a threat to scarce resources, while other communities rally to protect the creatures.”,”sectionLabels”:[{“name”:”Animals”,”type”:”sources”,”uri”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals”}],”theme”:”dark”,”tint”:”notint”,”title”:”As drought worsens, can Kenyan communities coexist with native wildlife?”}]},{“id”:”natgeo-template1-frame-1-module-1″,”cmsType”:”StackModule”,”align”:”left”,”edgs”:[{“dvdr”:{“hideLogo”:true},”cmsType”:”ArticleBodyTile”,”id”:”natgeo-template1-frame-1-module-1″,”bdy”:[{“id”:”html0″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Wajir County, KenyaThe men sitting inside the open-backed safari truck were silent and tense as they pulled up alongside their target. A young male giraffe stood under the shade of a tall tree, seeking relief from the unusually brutal March sun. As he heard the tires roll over dry thorn bushes, he craned his long neck and perked up his ears. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html1″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”The man in the passenger seat aimed his gun and pulled the trigger, hitting the giraffe squarely in the flank. The group let out a hushed cheer as the animal flinched. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html2″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”A man in the backseat set the timer on his watch. “Seven minutes until he falls,” he whispered. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html3″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”The giraffe wobbled drunkenly and then took off, loping into an open clearing. A six-foot log attached to his back foot by electrical wire dragged behind him. The men—a team of veterinarians from the government and a conservation nonprofit—were there to sedate him and remove the snare, set by poachers. If they didn’t, human or animal predators likely would kill the giraffe that night.”},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”b3bc2f29-036f-4e4a-b98f-cac98c02846f”,”cntnt”:{“cmsType”:”image”,”hasCopyright”:true,”id”:”b3bc2f29-036f-4e4a-b98f-cac98c02846f”,”lines”:3,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showMore”:true,”caption”:”A marabou stork perches on a tree near Lagboqol. Marabous are scavengers and frequently follow vultures to find food. Numbers of carrion eaters in the area have plummeted as an indirect result of drought. Thirst and hunger have pushed predators closer to towns, and people have responded by setting out poison that kills not only the targeted species but also the birds and other creatures that scavenge their carcasses.”,”image”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.499267935578331,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/28590d99-d770-4f3a-8da3-fcfcd0fccdf7/MM9880_220308_08338.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/28590d99-d770-4f3a-8da3-fcfcd0fccdf7/MM9880_220308_08338_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/28590d99-d770-4f3a-8da3-fcfcd0fccdf7/MM9880_220308_08338_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/28590d99-d770-4f3a-8da3-fcfcd0fccdf7/MM9880_220308_08338_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/28590d99-d770-4f3a-8da3-fcfcd0fccdf7/MM9880_220308_08338_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/28590d99-d770-4f3a-8da3-fcfcd0fccdf7/MM9880_220308_08338_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/28590d99-d770-4f3a-8da3-fcfcd0fccdf7/MM9880_220308_08338_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/28590d99-d770-4f3a-8da3-fcfcd0fccdf7/MM9880_220308_08338_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/28590d99-d770-4f3a-8da3-fcfcd0fccdf7/MM9880_220308_08338″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/28590d99-d770-4f3a-8da3-fcfcd0fccdf7/MM9880_220308_08338.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ed Ram”,”dsc”:”A marabou stork sits on a tree in near Lag-Boqol in Wajir County. Also known as undertaker birds, marabou storks are often seen in urban environments feeding from dumpsites. The huge birds wingspan can stretch up to 2.9m.”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”Kenya Drought 4″},”align”:”contentWidth”,”belowParagraph”:true,”imageSrc”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/28590d99-d770-4f3a-8da3-fcfcd0fccdf7/MM9880_220308_08338_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358″,”size”:”small”},”type”:”inline”},{“id”:”html4″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”The team sprinted after the giraffe and lassoed his legs, and he crashed down on his side. One veterinarian crouched by the giraffe’s head and held it down, covering the animal’s large brown eyes and long feathery eyelashes with a towel. The other vet used bolt cutters to snap the electrical wire. As they worked, men from a nearby village encircled them, pouring cool water on the giraffe’s body to protect him from the heat.”},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”68a2b86b-7021-4f1f-9dbd-89403c48e716″,”cntnt”:{“lnkHrefs”:[“https://interactives.natgeofe.com/high-touch/ngm-locator-map/builds/v3/css/base.css”],”scrptSrcs”:[“https://interactives.natgeofe.com/high-touch/ngm-locator-map/builds/v3/js/base.js”],”cmsType”:”markup”,”ariaLabel”:”markup”,”align”:”left”,”altTxt”:”Map showing story locations in Kenya: Mandera, Wajir, and Garissa, all in the eastern part of 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was over in minutes. The veterinarians administered the antidote to the tranquilizer and shouted for the crowd to clear. They pushed the giraffe’s head up and helped him stand. He looked around, as if surprised to see so many people milling around him. Then he lumbered over to a nearby tree, raised his head, and began to eat. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html6″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”During the past 35 years, the number of reticulated giraffes, which today live almost exclusively in northern Kenya, has dropped from 36,000 to fewer than 16,000—a 56 percent decline. The species was classified as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature in 2018. The giraffes have died in huge numbers, largely because of decades of tribal conflicts over land and resources, violence by the Somalia-based terrorist group al-Shabaab, and, perhaps most urgent, from climate change, which has accelerated habitat loss and increased poaching in the region. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html7″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”The Horn of Africa has endured three consecutive seasons of scant rainfall that have been linked to climate change. One more poor rainy season will make this the longest drought the region has experienced in four decades. Some 20 million people are in need of urgent food aid as crops fail and livestock die. Climate experts say that even an average rainy season wouldn’t be enough to undo the damage of the past few years.”},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”9a395925-33f4-4607-a27b-5230f1794ad6″,”cntnt”:{“cmsType”:”image”,”hasCopyright”:true,”id”:”9a395925-33f4-4607-a27b-5230f1794ad6″,”lines”:3,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showMore”:true,”caption”:”Somali-Kenyan Sharmake Yussuf poses for a portrait outside the town of Garissa. As the competition between people and wild animals over scarce resources in the area grew increasingly deadly, Yussef became determined to find a way to help people thrive alongside wildlife rather than see it as a threat. Since 2011, he’s been working directly with locals on community conservation efforts.”,”image”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.499267935578331,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/55a35501-bcb1-4b3d-b86b-402b0c30dbea/MM9880_220306_04072.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/55a35501-bcb1-4b3d-b86b-402b0c30dbea/MM9880_220306_04072_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/55a35501-bcb1-4b3d-b86b-402b0c30dbea/MM9880_220306_04072_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/55a35501-bcb1-4b3d-b86b-402b0c30dbea/MM9880_220306_04072_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/55a35501-bcb1-4b3d-b86b-402b0c30dbea/MM9880_220306_04072_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/55a35501-bcb1-4b3d-b86b-402b0c30dbea/MM9880_220306_04072_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/55a35501-bcb1-4b3d-b86b-402b0c30dbea/MM9880_220306_04072_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/55a35501-bcb1-4b3d-b86b-402b0c30dbea/MM9880_220306_04072_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/55a35501-bcb1-4b3d-b86b-402b0c30dbea/MM9880_220306_04072″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/55a35501-bcb1-4b3d-b86b-402b0c30dbea/MM9880_220306_04072.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ed Ram”,”dsc”:”Sharmake Yussef (in the white shirt), Dr. Abdullahi Ali (in the green) sit in the middle of a community meeting in Bula Hodan, Sankur, on the outskirts of Garissa Town. Men and women gathered under an acacia tree in the village to discuss the importance of wildlife, conservation and protecting wild animals from poaching. After the meeting Sharmake said that community members were interested in incorporating the region into a community conservancy.”,”ext”:”jpg”},”align”:”pageWidth”,”belowParagraph”:true,”imageSrc”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/55a35501-bcb1-4b3d-b86b-402b0c30dbea/MM9880_220306_04072_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358″,”size”:”medium”},”type”:”inline”},{“id”:”69abb2de-dad7-45f5-a36d-e1c28e5e7fec”,”cntnt”:{“cmsType”:”image”,”hasCopyright”:true,”id”:”69abb2de-dad7-45f5-a36d-e1c28e5e7fec”,”lines”:3,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showMore”:true,”caption”:”Yussuf and conservation scientist Abdullahi Ali sit in the middle of a community meeting on the outskirts of Garissa, where Ali is from. Here, men and women have gathered under an acacia tree to discuss the importance of wildlife, conservation and protecting animals from poaching.”,”image”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.499267935578331,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2b795b6d-c6cc-4d44-a9d5-8e2ddc90ffa6/MM9880_220306_02947.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2b795b6d-c6cc-4d44-a9d5-8e2ddc90ffa6/MM9880_220306_02947_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2b795b6d-c6cc-4d44-a9d5-8e2ddc90ffa6/MM9880_220306_02947_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2b795b6d-c6cc-4d44-a9d5-8e2ddc90ffa6/MM9880_220306_02947_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2b795b6d-c6cc-4d44-a9d5-8e2ddc90ffa6/MM9880_220306_02947_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2b795b6d-c6cc-4d44-a9d5-8e2ddc90ffa6/MM9880_220306_02947_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2b795b6d-c6cc-4d44-a9d5-8e2ddc90ffa6/MM9880_220306_02947_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2b795b6d-c6cc-4d44-a9d5-8e2ddc90ffa6/MM9880_220306_02947_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2b795b6d-c6cc-4d44-a9d5-8e2ddc90ffa6/MM9880_220306_02947″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2b795b6d-c6cc-4d44-a9d5-8e2ddc90ffa6/MM9880_220306_02947.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ed Ram”,”dsc”:”Sharmake Yussef (in the white shirt), Dr. Abdullahi Ali (in the green) sit in the middle of a community meeting in Bula Hodan, Sankur, on the outskirts of Garissa Town. Men and women gathered under an acacia tree in the village to discuss the importance of wildlife, conservation and protecting wild animals from poaching. After the meeting Sharmake said that community members were interested in incorporating the region into a community conservancy.”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”Kenya Drought 3″},”align”:”browserWidth”,”imageSrc”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2b795b6d-c6cc-4d44-a9d5-8e2ddc90ffa6/MM9880_220306_02947_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358″,”size”:”large”},”type”:”inline”},{“id”:”html8″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”“Drought is a slow-onset disaster that creeps in slowly but has serious impact,” says Jully Ouma, a climate scientist at Igad Climate Prediction and Applications Center in Nairobi. “It takes time to recover.””},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html9″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Today, the northeastern counties of Garissa, Wajir, and Mandera are covered in red dust. The bushes and trees are dead. And the air smells like rotting flesh from the carcasses of goats, camels, and donkeys that have collapsed along roadsides from starvation and thirst. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html10″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Drought doesn’t discriminate between livestock and wildlife. But in many ways, wild animals are far more vulnerable to its effects than their domesticated cousins. “For the livestock, humans can move with them and direct them to where they think pasture and water are, but the wildlife have to survive on their own,” Ouma says.  “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html11″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Climate change is hitting the region’s wild animals on several fronts. It’s exacerbating human-wildlife conflict and habitat destruction, as traditionally nomadic pastoralists lose their livestock and settle in what was once wildlife habitat. It’s ramping up poaching, as locals and refugees kill animals to eliminate competition for scarce resources, feed themselves and their families, or sell their meat for a small income. And it’s also affecting wildlife directly, as animals simply drop dead from the extreme, unyielding heat and lack of food and water. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html12″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Local wildlife activists are creating community-based conservancies across northeast Kenya to protect its unique species, including the reticulated giraffe, the critically endangered hirola antelope, the endangered Grevy’s zebra, and the blue-necked Somali ostrich. But without large-scale interventions to stem the destruction of climate change, future generations may never have the opportunity to live among these rare animals. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”7e46f993-a91e-4551-b6a7-1a2818f05fe5″,”cntnt”:{“cmsType”:”image”,”hasCopyright”:true,”id”:”7e46f993-a91e-4551-b6a7-1a2818f05fe5″,”lines”:3,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showMore”:true,”caption”:”At a giraffe sanctuary in Garissa, a manmade watering hole has just been filled. Thirsty giraffes come from the surrounding area to drink when they can’t find water elsewhere. To fill the hole, volunteers truck in water from the nearby Tana River.”,”image”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.499267935578331,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2961f6a1-b72b-4db4-a3be-1dcc54572faa/MM9880_220306_02571.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2961f6a1-b72b-4db4-a3be-1dcc54572faa/MM9880_220306_02571_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2961f6a1-b72b-4db4-a3be-1dcc54572faa/MM9880_220306_02571_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2961f6a1-b72b-4db4-a3be-1dcc54572faa/MM9880_220306_02571_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2961f6a1-b72b-4db4-a3be-1dcc54572faa/MM9880_220306_02571_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2961f6a1-b72b-4db4-a3be-1dcc54572faa/MM9880_220306_02571_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2961f6a1-b72b-4db4-a3be-1dcc54572faa/MM9880_220306_02571_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2961f6a1-b72b-4db4-a3be-1dcc54572faa/MM9880_220306_02571_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2961f6a1-b72b-4db4-a3be-1dcc54572faa/MM9880_220306_02571″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2961f6a1-b72b-4db4-a3be-1dcc54572faa/MM9880_220306_02571.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ed Ram”,”dsc”:”A man made concreate watering hole at Garissa giraffe sanctuary that’s just been filled with water. Thirstry giraffes come from the surrounding area to drink from the watering hole when they are unable to find water in the local area. The watering hole had just been filled by a large truck carrying water from the Tana river that runs through Garissa town. Giraffe, that had smelled the fresh water and where in the area were approaching the watering whole in the giraffe sanctuary, where they are also fed acacia seed pods by the people who work there.”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”Kenya Drought 2″},”align”:”pageWidth”,”belowParagraph”:true,”imageSrc”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/2961f6a1-b72b-4db4-a3be-1dcc54572faa/MM9880_220306_02571_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358″,”size”:”medium”},”type”:”inline”},{“id”:”7aae4af1-6f74-4920-b351-87b16a9abe01″,”cntnt”:{“cmsType”:”image”,”hasCopyright”:true,”id”:”7aae4af1-6f74-4920-b351-87b16a9abe01″,”lines”:3,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showMore”:true,”caption”:”An aerial photo shows giraffes at dusk near Garissa as they journey in search of water.”,”image”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5a39c154-844f-49ab-828f-242614b52d50/MM9880_220306_04128.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5a39c154-844f-49ab-828f-242614b52d50/MM9880_220306_04128_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5a39c154-844f-49ab-828f-242614b52d50/MM9880_220306_04128_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5a39c154-844f-49ab-828f-242614b52d50/MM9880_220306_04128_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5a39c154-844f-49ab-828f-242614b52d50/MM9880_220306_04128_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5a39c154-844f-49ab-828f-242614b52d50/MM9880_220306_04128_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5a39c154-844f-49ab-828f-242614b52d50/MM9880_220306_04128_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5a39c154-844f-49ab-828f-242614b52d50/MM9880_220306_04128_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5a39c154-844f-49ab-828f-242614b52d50/MM9880_220306_04128″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5a39c154-844f-49ab-828f-242614b52d50/MM9880_220306_04128.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ed Ram”,”dsc”:”An aerail shot of Giraffes standing behing a tree near a road on the outskirts of Garissa town at dusk. Just outside Garissa town, homes are popping up on either side of the main road. Every evening, as the sun sets over the Tana River, giraffes travel from their grazing land in the east across the main road to drink water. What was once a traditional migration corridor has now been blocked off by high concrete walls, and the giraffes walk from plot to plot searching for a small opening. When they find one, they rush across the road in groups, wary of speeding cars and motorcycles.”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”Kenya Drought 1″},”align”:”browserWidth”,”imageSrc”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5a39c154-844f-49ab-828f-242614b52d50/MM9880_220306_04128_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358″,”size”:”large”},”type”:”inline”},{“id”:”html13″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”The birth of NECA “},”type”:”h2″},{“id”:”html14″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”In 2011, 48-year-old Sharmake Yussuf was driving down the M1 highway from London to Sheffield when he received a call from his stepmother in Wajir County, Kenya. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html15″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Yussuf, a Kenyan-Somali who had been working as a systems engineer in the United Kingdom for 20 years, had bought some camels, highly valued in Somali culture, several months earlier. Yussuf’s stepmother informed him that a lion had killed and eaten one of his prized animals. Bad luck, Yussuf thought to himself before putting the incident out of his mind. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html16″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”On his drive back to London the next day, Yussuf’s stepmother called back. She had poisoned the carcass of the camel, she told him proudly, and the lion had died an agonizing death when it returned to finish its meal. Yussuf was furious. To him, the lion was far more precious than the camel. But revenge killings have always been a part of Somali pastoralist culture—a way of ensuring that predators such as lions, hyenas, and cheetahs stick to eating wild animals and don’t develop a taste for livestock. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html17″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”“It dawned on me how my community looks at wildlife, and I made a decision there and then to try to do something within my community to change how they view conservation,” Yussuf says. He returned to Kenya a few months later and realized just how few conservancies and reserves there were in the northeast. Even the veterinarians who came to rescue the young male giraffe were brought in from Nairobi, over 200 miles away, and Meru, about 140 miles away.”},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”bddc62d2-e593-4bcb-92b2-525d6ea7e239″,”cntnt”:{“cmsType”:”image”,”hasCopyright”:true,”id”:”bddc62d2-e593-4bcb-92b2-525d6ea7e239″,”lines”:3,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showMore”:true,”caption”:”A vehicle drags the dead giraffe found in the dried-up reservoir in Wajir County, with Wildlife Service rangers close behind on foot. Rangers believe the giraffe died a few weeks prior, already weak from hunger and dehydration before it got stuck in mud. Moving the giraffe’s body prevents the mud from being contaminated.”,”image”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.499267935578331,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/169d89d2-f43a-44b5-ba4e-59aa50df981f/MM9880_220308_08189.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/169d89d2-f43a-44b5-ba4e-59aa50df981f/MM9880_220308_08189_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/169d89d2-f43a-44b5-ba4e-59aa50df981f/MM9880_220308_08189_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/169d89d2-f43a-44b5-ba4e-59aa50df981f/MM9880_220308_08189_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/169d89d2-f43a-44b5-ba4e-59aa50df981f/MM9880_220308_08189_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/169d89d2-f43a-44b5-ba4e-59aa50df981f/MM9880_220308_08189_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/169d89d2-f43a-44b5-ba4e-59aa50df981f/MM9880_220308_08189_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/169d89d2-f43a-44b5-ba4e-59aa50df981f/MM9880_220308_08189_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/169d89d2-f43a-44b5-ba4e-59aa50df981f/MM9880_220308_08189″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/169d89d2-f43a-44b5-ba4e-59aa50df981f/MM9880_220308_08189.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ed Ram”,”dsc”:”Kenya Wildlife Services rangers from Wajir move the body of a giraffe out of a dried up reservoir near Lag-Boqol in Wajir Country. They walk behind the giraffe, which is thought to hae died a few weeks beforehand as it’s dragged behing the vehicle. The giraffe, weak from lack of food and water, died after it got stuck in mud as as it tried to find water in the nearly dried-up reservoir. The giraffe is moved to prevent contamination of the reservoir water.”,”ext”:”jpg”},”align”:”browserWidth”,”belowParagraph”:true,”imageSrc”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/169d89d2-f43a-44b5-ba4e-59aa50df981f/MM9880_220308_08189_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358″,”size”:”large”},”type”:”inline”},{“id”:”html18″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Northeast Kenya, long viewed by Nairobi as a rogue and troublesome region, has seen relatively little government investment in infrastructure and development since its independence from British colonial rule in 1963. This has made communities there especially vulnerable to the effects of drought and increased competition for scarce resources, damaging the once-peaceful relationship between humans and wildlife. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html19″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Regional instability also meant that the northeast was widely believed to have minimal wildlife. But in 2021, during Kenya’s first-ever national wildlife census, air pilots surveying Garissa, Wajir, and Mandera counties discovered 6,000 reticulated giraffes, more than a third of the world’s remaining population, 302 Grevy’s zebras, and 141 lions.”},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html20″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Yussuf was determined to find a way to help people thrive alongside this wildlife, rather than see them as a threat. He turned to community-based conservation, considered one of the soundest forms of protection. The land that professional rangers are responsible for patrolling is far too vast to have eyes everywhere. So, when the community unites around wildlife protection, it can be particularly effective. Communities set aside land for wild animals, and in return, specific grazing areas are designated for livestock. The presence of abundant wildlife also promises income from foreign tourists. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html21″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Persuading communities to share their land with wildlife, however, isn’t easy. Pastoralists often are afraid that conservation will mean higher numbers of predators that threaten their livestock, and that fencing off certain areas will prevent them from grazing their cows, goats, and camels there. Access to grazing lands historically has been a heated point of debate between pastoralists and conservationists.”},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”9d48e103-9d2d-4971-ad2f-1633c973ed89″,”cntnt”:{“cmsType”:”image”,”hasCopyright”:true,”id”:”9d48e103-9d2d-4971-ad2f-1633c973ed89″,”lines”:3,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showMore”:true,”caption”:”Camels drink at a watering hole near Sabuli Conservancy, a 510,000-acre swath of land founded in 2018 and now managed by 30 rangers. Like at other community-based conservancies in the region, land for livestock grazing has been set aside to reduce competition for resources between wildlife and domesticated animals.”,”image”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.499267935578331,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/d50a21e7-55c3-4643-8efd-4912e56848ce/MM9880_220307_06538.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/d50a21e7-55c3-4643-8efd-4912e56848ce/MM9880_220307_06538_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/d50a21e7-55c3-4643-8efd-4912e56848ce/MM9880_220307_06538_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/d50a21e7-55c3-4643-8efd-4912e56848ce/MM9880_220307_06538_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/d50a21e7-55c3-4643-8efd-4912e56848ce/MM9880_220307_06538_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/d50a21e7-55c3-4643-8efd-4912e56848ce/MM9880_220307_06538_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/d50a21e7-55c3-4643-8efd-4912e56848ce/MM9880_220307_06538_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/d50a21e7-55c3-4643-8efd-4912e56848ce/MM9880_220307_06538_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/d50a21e7-55c3-4643-8efd-4912e56848ce/MM9880_220307_06538″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/d50a21e7-55c3-4643-8efd-4912e56848ce/MM9880_220307_06538.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ed Ram”,”dsc”:”A caravan of camels drink from a water trough on the outskirts of Sabuli village. Camels are one of the most climate-resilient mammals but many have died in the region as a result of the drought over the past months.”,”ext”:”jpg”},”align”:”pageWidth”,”belowParagraph”:true,”imageSrc”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/d50a21e7-55c3-4643-8efd-4912e56848ce/MM9880_220307_06538_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358″,”size”:”medium”},”type”:”inline”},{“id”:”html22″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Yussuf, broad-shouldered and crisply dressed even in the most withering heat, has a bright smile and inexhaustible energy for advocating for wildlife protection in the Somali community. For seven years, he engaged community elders and imams, local government officials, and residents about their responsibility to care for these animals. There would have been no point moving forward without their blessing.”},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html23″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”“I went one village at a time, one tribe at a time, one subclan at a time,” he says.  “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html24″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”His persistence paid off, and in 2018 he formed Sabuli Conservancy, 510,000 acres now protected by 30 conservancy rangers. Last year, Yussuf founded the North-Eastern Conservancies Association (NECA), an umbrella organization that unites Sabuli and seven other conservancies spanning nearly two million acres. Another 18 conservancies have been proposed, which would bring the total area of protected land to five million acres. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html25″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Challenges to animals, and to a way of life”},”type”:”h2″},{“id”:”html26″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Just outside the town of Garissa, homes are popping up on either side of the main road. Kenya’s population has grown nearly sevenfold since the 1960s, and as droughts hit with increasing frequency and intensity, nomadic pastoralists are giving up their traditional way of life and settling in villages. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”79b988ee-bfb1-49b6-8e8c-fabdb443a976″,”cntnt”:{“cmsType”:”image”,”hasCopyright”:true,”id”:”79b988ee-bfb1-49b6-8e8c-fabdb443a976″,”lines”:3,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showMore”:true,”caption”:”Kenya Wildlife Service rangers and residents of Kursi village inspect the community’s manmade reservoir in Sabuli Conservancy. The reservoir took 20 years to complete but is now shrinking because giraffes are increasingly come at night to quench their thirst, angering local residents.”,”image”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.499267935578331,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/54bbc296-2ff6-4fd3-bba6-c8ef657abda7/MM9880_220307_06751.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/54bbc296-2ff6-4fd3-bba6-c8ef657abda7/MM9880_220307_06751_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/54bbc296-2ff6-4fd3-bba6-c8ef657abda7/MM9880_220307_06751_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/54bbc296-2ff6-4fd3-bba6-c8ef657abda7/MM9880_220307_06751_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/54bbc296-2ff6-4fd3-bba6-c8ef657abda7/MM9880_220307_06751_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/54bbc296-2ff6-4fd3-bba6-c8ef657abda7/MM9880_220307_06751_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/54bbc296-2ff6-4fd3-bba6-c8ef657abda7/MM9880_220307_06751_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/54bbc296-2ff6-4fd3-bba6-c8ef657abda7/MM9880_220307_06751_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/54bbc296-2ff6-4fd3-bba6-c8ef657abda7/MM9880_220307_06751″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/54bbc296-2ff6-4fd3-bba6-c8ef657abda7/MM9880_220307_06751.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ed Ram”,”dsc”:”Sharmake Mohamed and KWS rangers go with residents of Kursi village to inspect the community’s man made reservoir in Sabuli Conservancy. Local residents are also locked in a battle with giraffes over precious water resources. The sweet fresh water from the massive reservoir that took 20 years to complete is dwindling because the giraffes come at night to quench their thirst.”,”ext”:”jpg”},”align”:”pageWidth”,”belowParagraph”:true,”imageSrc”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/54bbc296-2ff6-4fd3-bba6-c8ef657abda7/MM9880_220307_06751_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358″,”size”:”medium”},”type”:”inline”},{“id”:”html27″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Every evening, as the sun sets over the Tana River, giraffes travel from their grazing land in the east across the main road to drink. What was once a traditional migration corridor is now blocked by high concrete walls, and the giraffes walk from plot to plot searching for an opening. When they find one, they rush across the road in groups, wary of speeding cars and motorcycles. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html28″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”“During the day, they give a chance to humans to use the river, and they move away,” says National Geographic Explorer Abdullahi Ali, a Garissa-born conservation scientist specializing in reticulated giraffes and hirolas. “In the evening, they have to come back.” (Ali won National Geographic/Buffett Awards for Leadership in Conservation in 2021.)“},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html29″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Ali worries that one day this entire area will be fenced in, and giraffes will be pushed out of their ancestral home altogether. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html30″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”“That would be a huge catastrophe. Can you imagine a world without giraffes?” he asks. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”d6a9ec49-a53a-4ead-860e-e082a1428983″,”cntnt”:{“cmsType”:”image”,”hasCopyright”:true,”id”:”d6a9ec49-a53a-4ead-860e-e082a1428983″,”lines”:3,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showMore”:true,”caption”:”Goat and sheep herders mind their livestock as they drink from a watering hole in Sabuli Conservancy. The men had just chased off a thirsty warthog that had come to drink. Drought has killed livestock such as goats, camels, and donkeys, driving many pastoralists to give up their way of life.”,”image”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.499267935578331,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/455a039a-b072-488f-a7b6-110fd0fa7cd8/MM9880_220307_04929.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/455a039a-b072-488f-a7b6-110fd0fa7cd8/MM9880_220307_04929_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/455a039a-b072-488f-a7b6-110fd0fa7cd8/MM9880_220307_04929_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/455a039a-b072-488f-a7b6-110fd0fa7cd8/MM9880_220307_04929_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/455a039a-b072-488f-a7b6-110fd0fa7cd8/MM9880_220307_04929_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/455a039a-b072-488f-a7b6-110fd0fa7cd8/MM9880_220307_04929_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/455a039a-b072-488f-a7b6-110fd0fa7cd8/MM9880_220307_04929_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/455a039a-b072-488f-a7b6-110fd0fa7cd8/MM9880_220307_04929_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/455a039a-b072-488f-a7b6-110fd0fa7cd8/MM9880_220307_04929″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/455a039a-b072-488f-a7b6-110fd0fa7cd8/MM9880_220307_04929.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ed Ram”,”dsc”:”Goat and sheep herders mind their livestock as they drink from a watering hole in Fiini village in Sabuli Conservancy. The men where chasing way thirsty Warthog from the surrounding area that had come to drink water that had come out of the troughs.”,”ext”:”jpg”},”align”:”contentWidth”,”belowParagraph”:true,”imageSrc”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/455a039a-b072-488f-a7b6-110fd0fa7cd8/MM9880_220307_04929_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358″,”size”:”small”},”type”:”inline”},{“id”:”6147473e-acde-4bb0-bcdb-bfa8b6c9a3f7″,”cntnt”:{“cmsType”:”image”,”hasCopyright”:true,”id”:”6147473e-acde-4bb0-bcdb-bfa8b6c9a3f7″,”lines”:3,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showMore”:true,”caption”:”Women roll barrels of water back to town after collecting it from a reservoir in Sabuli Conservancy. One more poor rainy season will make this the longest drought the region has experienced in four decades.”,”image”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.499267935578331,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ea5d2493-abc8-46f1-8975-6a8c1b1f40f9/MM9880_220308_07659.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ea5d2493-abc8-46f1-8975-6a8c1b1f40f9/MM9880_220308_07659_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ea5d2493-abc8-46f1-8975-6a8c1b1f40f9/MM9880_220308_07659_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ea5d2493-abc8-46f1-8975-6a8c1b1f40f9/MM9880_220308_07659_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ea5d2493-abc8-46f1-8975-6a8c1b1f40f9/MM9880_220308_07659_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ea5d2493-abc8-46f1-8975-6a8c1b1f40f9/MM9880_220308_07659_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ea5d2493-abc8-46f1-8975-6a8c1b1f40f9/MM9880_220308_07659_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ea5d2493-abc8-46f1-8975-6a8c1b1f40f9/MM9880_220308_07659_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ea5d2493-abc8-46f1-8975-6a8c1b1f40f9/MM9880_220308_07659″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ea5d2493-abc8-46f1-8975-6a8c1b1f40f9/MM9880_220308_07659.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ed Ram”,”dsc”:”People collect water from a dam or reservoir in eyrib town in in Sabuli conservancy Wajir County in Sabuli conservancy. Eyrib, a town outside Wajir that depends on clean water from several large reservoirs built by the government back in the 1980s. But most of them have dried up because of the drought. Unable to find any other water, thirsty giraffes travel to drink from the small muddy puddles still left in the centre of the reservoirs.”,”ext”:”jpg”},”align”:”pageWidth”,”imageSrc”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ea5d2493-abc8-46f1-8975-6a8c1b1f40f9/MM9880_220308_07659_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358″,”size”:”medium”},”type”:”inline”},{“id”:”html31″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”The Tana River provides irrigation for a few farms near Garissa that grow beans, mangos, and other crops that are lifelines for local people. As the drought has intensified, the giraffes have started venturing into these farms at night, braving the possibility of human interaction to find water. They trample the crops, which has prompted the farmers to begin patrolling their fields carrying machetes and broken bottles. When they encounter an unsuspecting, thirsty giraffe, they slash its legs. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html32″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”“Either you take care of the giraffes, or we will,” says 45-year-old Habiba Bilow, warning the conservationists. She is considering giving up her farm because of the destruction caused by giraffes.”},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html33″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”The Kenya Wildlife Service compensates pastoralists when they lose their animals to predators, but some people wait years to see the money. In the meantime, they find other ways of seeking retribution. Last year in Sabuli, a lion killed two lactating cows, prompting angry local residents to poison one of the carcasses. When the lion returned to finish its meal the next day, it went blind, and the town stoned it to death. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”1978caee-60dd-456d-b474-131954eb25a0″,”cntnt”:{“cmsType”:”image”,”hasCopyright”:true,”id”:”1978caee-60dd-456d-b474-131954eb25a0″,”lines”:3,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showMore”:true,”caption”:”Abdullahi Ali poses for a portrait outside his hometown of Garissa. Ali, a National Geographic Explorer, founded the Hirola Conservation Program, which aims to work with communities to stop the silent extinction of the rare and critically endangered hirola antelope in areas along the Kenya-Somalia border. Between 300 and 500 hirola remain in the wild, threatened by habitat loss, poaching, and drought.”,”image”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.499267935578331,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fef02575-d16e-4315-8271-dbe9727473c7/MM9880_220306_04084.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fef02575-d16e-4315-8271-dbe9727473c7/MM9880_220306_04084_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fef02575-d16e-4315-8271-dbe9727473c7/MM9880_220306_04084_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fef02575-d16e-4315-8271-dbe9727473c7/MM9880_220306_04084_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fef02575-d16e-4315-8271-dbe9727473c7/MM9880_220306_04084_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fef02575-d16e-4315-8271-dbe9727473c7/MM9880_220306_04084_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fef02575-d16e-4315-8271-dbe9727473c7/MM9880_220306_04084_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fef02575-d16e-4315-8271-dbe9727473c7/MM9880_220306_04084_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fef02575-d16e-4315-8271-dbe9727473c7/MM9880_220306_04084″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fef02575-d16e-4315-8271-dbe9727473c7/MM9880_220306_04084.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ed Ram”,”dsc”:”Dr. Abdullahi Ali, a conservation scientist specializing in reticulated giraffes and hirola antelopes, poses for a photograph in National Geographic’s outdoor studio near Sankur on the outskirts of Garissa town.Dr. Ali, a native of Garissa, worries that one day this entire area will be plotted out and fenced in, and giraffes will be pushed out of their ancestral home altogether.”,”ext”:”jpg”},”align”:”contentWidth”,”belowParagraph”:true,”imageSrc”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fef02575-d16e-4315-8271-dbe9727473c7/MM9880_220306_04084_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358″,”size”:”small”},”type”:”inline”},{“id”:”html34″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Incidents like these are also responsible for the death of vultures and scavenging birds, which clean up the remains of other animals’ kills. Today, most of these birds have been killed in secondhand poisonings. The skies are empty. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html35″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Poaching “},”type”:”h2″},{“id”:”html36″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Yussuf is in Garissa in March when he receives word that poachers have turned up in Sabuli Conservancy. It’s about an hour’s drive from Dadaab refugee camp, which hosts more than 218,000 mostly Somali refugees who have fled conflict, drought, and famine in their country. Young refugees here have few ways other than hunting and collecting firewood to support themselves and their families. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html37″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Yussuf estimates that 63 giraffes were killed by poachers across the northeast in 2021. Over a five day period  in March 2022, refugees killed three giraffes in and around Sabuli, likely to sell the meat in butcher stalls in the camp and across the border in Somalia.”},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html38″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Some refugees also bring donkey caravans into the protected areas to forage for firewood to sell. The journey by foot takes nearly a week, and they often hunt dik-dik and other small game to eat during their journey.”},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”6b270e78-dec6-4e90-8da7-17e9b4d33240″,”cntnt”:{“cmsType”:”image”,”hasCopyright”:true,”id”:”6b270e78-dec6-4e90-8da7-17e9b4d33240″,”lines”:3,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showMore”:true,”caption”:”Kenya Wildlife Service rangers catch and sedate a giraffe just outside of Garissa in March. The giraffe had been caught in a snare set by poachers and, without help, would likely have been killed soon by humans or predators. Poachers set snares for giraffes to eliminate competition for scarce resources, and to sell their meat for extra income.”,”image”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:4.5913370998116765,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e0d12ab2-54b5-4619-97e9-c4dac91e02c5/triptych3.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e0d12ab2-54b5-4619-97e9-c4dac91e02c5/triptych3_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e0d12ab2-54b5-4619-97e9-c4dac91e02c5/triptych3_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e0d12ab2-54b5-4619-97e9-c4dac91e02c5/triptych3_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e0d12ab2-54b5-4619-97e9-c4dac91e02c5/triptych3_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e0d12ab2-54b5-4619-97e9-c4dac91e02c5/triptych3_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e0d12ab2-54b5-4619-97e9-c4dac91e02c5/triptych3_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e0d12ab2-54b5-4619-97e9-c4dac91e02c5/triptych3_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e0d12ab2-54b5-4619-97e9-c4dac91e02c5/triptych3″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e0d12ab2-54b5-4619-97e9-c4dac91e02c5/triptych3.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ed Ram”,”dsc”:”Kenya Wildlife Sevice rangers try to catch a snared giraffe near Sankur on the outskirts of Garissa town.”,”ext”:”jpg”},”align”:”browserWidth”,”belowParagraph”:true,”imageSrc”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e0d12ab2-54b5-4619-97e9-c4dac91e02c5/triptych3_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358″,”size”:”large”},”type”:”inline”},{“id”:”26f532bd-b281-4949-beaa-e4baaddbbd50″,”cntnt”:{“cmsType”:”image”,”hasCopyright”:true,”id”:”26f532bd-b281-4949-beaa-e4baaddbbd50″,”lines”:3,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showMore”:true,”caption”:”A ranger pours cool water on the giraffe’s body while another helps him stand up. To help the giraffe, the team sedated him with a tranquilizer dart, then removed the wire snare from his leg with bolt cutters.”,”image”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.499267935578331,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e87b6be2-3aac-45ce-8747-e0c021893377/MM9880_220306_03114.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e87b6be2-3aac-45ce-8747-e0c021893377/MM9880_220306_03114_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e87b6be2-3aac-45ce-8747-e0c021893377/MM9880_220306_03114_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e87b6be2-3aac-45ce-8747-e0c021893377/MM9880_220306_03114_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e87b6be2-3aac-45ce-8747-e0c021893377/MM9880_220306_03114_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e87b6be2-3aac-45ce-8747-e0c021893377/MM9880_220306_03114_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e87b6be2-3aac-45ce-8747-e0c021893377/MM9880_220306_03114_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e87b6be2-3aac-45ce-8747-e0c021893377/MM9880_220306_03114_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e87b6be2-3aac-45ce-8747-e0c021893377/MM9880_220306_03114″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e87b6be2-3aac-45ce-8747-e0c021893377/MM9880_220306_03114.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ed Ram”,”dsc”:”Kenya Wildlife Service rangers free a giraffe before it stands up after having been freed from a snare near Sankur on the outskirts of Garissa town. Local people and rangers from Sabuli Wildlife Conservancy look on in the background after a wire was removed from its foot. The giraffe had just been shot with a pink tranquilliser dart as rangers were looking to free it from the piece of wire attached to its foot. The rangers each held one end of the long rope and ran around the giraffe, thus tieing its legs together until it collapsed on the ground. The Giraffe had been found by local people limping with a suspected rudimentary snare attached it its foot. The snare consisted of a thick metal wire, tied in a loop at one end and to a large branch at the other. Men who had found the giraffe from the local community had stayed with the giraffe overnight and in the scorching sun the next day to protect it from poachers while they waited for a vet and rangers from Kenya Wildlife Service to arrive from Nanyuki, hundreds of kilometres west of Garissa.”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”Kenya Drought 5″},”align”:”browserWidth”,”imageSrc”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e87b6be2-3aac-45ce-8747-e0c021893377/MM9880_220306_03114_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358″,”size”:”large”},”type”:”inline”},{“id”:”html39″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Yussuf has organized a poaching patrol with rangers from the Kenya Wildlife Service in Wajir, local police, and Sabuli’s community rangers. Armed and ready, the caravan of vehicles sets off, traveling on dusty rough roads that turn into narrow winding paths. Eventually, they come upon a group of seven young men relaxing under a tree, seeking respite from the 100-degree heat. Each one has a donkey cart piled ten feet high with firewood. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html40″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”The rangers jump out of the car and round up the young men, shouting threats in their faces. They search each man and discover several sharp, serrated hunting knives and a food sack covered in blood. Just down the road they find the spindly, fragile legs of a mostly eaten dik-dik. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html41″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”The rangers consider burning all the firewood to teach the young men a lesson but decide against it. The dry conditions could cause uncontrollable wildfires. Instead, they knock down the carts, spilling the contents of five days of labor onto the ground. When the rangers are gone, the refugees will pick up each log and place it back in the carts. They have rented these carts from businessmen in Dadaab and cannot risk showing up empty-handed. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html42″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Dropping dead”},”type”:”h2″},{“id”:”html43″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Ali Gedi, a 50-year-old goat herder and father of 10, remembers the days before climate change ravaged this land. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”f02dfbac-a6c3-43a5-aa2a-5840b65b23f0″,”cntnt”:{“cmsType”:”image”,”hasCopyright”:true,”id”:”f02dfbac-a6c3-43a5-aa2a-5840b65b23f0″,”lines”:3,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showMore”:true,”caption”:”Men from Garissa hold up a snare that was attached to a giraffe’s foot—a thick metal cord tied in a loop at one end and to a large branch at the other. Some of the community members had found the giraffe and stayed with him overnight and into the scorching next day to protect him from poachers while they waited for a rescue team to arrive from the town of Nanyuki, several hundred miles west of Garissa.”,”image”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.498456790123457,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5e089212-0a5a-476f-a641-d634f4d8f90d/MM9880_220306_03165.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5e089212-0a5a-476f-a641-d634f4d8f90d/MM9880_220306_03165_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5e089212-0a5a-476f-a641-d634f4d8f90d/MM9880_220306_03165_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5e089212-0a5a-476f-a641-d634f4d8f90d/MM9880_220306_03165_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5e089212-0a5a-476f-a641-d634f4d8f90d/MM9880_220306_03165_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5e089212-0a5a-476f-a641-d634f4d8f90d/MM9880_220306_03165_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5e089212-0a5a-476f-a641-d634f4d8f90d/MM9880_220306_03165_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5e089212-0a5a-476f-a641-d634f4d8f90d/MM9880_220306_03165_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5e089212-0a5a-476f-a641-d634f4d8f90d/MM9880_220306_03165″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5e089212-0a5a-476f-a641-d634f4d8f90d/MM9880_220306_03165.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ed Ram”,”dsc”:”Men from the local community hold up a suspected snare that was attached to a giraffe’s foot near Sankur on the outskirts of Garissa town. The giraffe had been caught and the snare wire removed from the giraffe’s hind leg. The Giraffe had been found by local people limping with a suspected rudimentary snare attached it its foot. The snare consisted of a thick metal wire, tied in a loop at one end and to a large branch at the other. Men who had found the giraffe from the local community had stayed with the giraffe overnight and in the scorching sun the next day to protect it from poachers while they waited for a vet and rangers from Kenya Wildlife Service to arrive from Nanyuki, hundreds of kilometres west of Garissa.”,”ext”:”jpg”},”align”:”pageWidth”,”belowParagraph”:true,”imageSrc”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/5e089212-0a5a-476f-a641-d634f4d8f90d/MM9880_220306_03165_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358″,”size”:”medium”},”type”:”inline”},{“id”:”html44″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”“I used to see elephants as a child,” he recalls. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html45″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”But the elephants left northeast Kenya long ago, driven out by poaching and habitat destruction, and local residents have suffered from their loss. The elephants used to trample the brush with their massive flat feet, creating grasslands where goats and antelopes could graze side by side. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html46″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”“We lost a lot of benefits when the elephants left,” Gedi says. “We won’t allow the same thing to happen to the giraffes.””},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html47″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Gedi is from Eyrib, a town outside Wajir that depends on several large reservoirs built by the government back in the 1980s. But in the final months of 2021, most nearly dried up because of the drought. Since then, giraffes, unable to find any other water, travel to drink from the small muddy puddles still left in the center of the huge reservoirs. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”33d041a3-42ce-4ed2-9da1-afdaaa7b1050″,”cntnt”:{“cmsType”:”image”,”hasCopyright”:true,”id”:”33d041a3-42ce-4ed2-9da1-afdaaa7b1050″,”lines”:3,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showMore”:true,”caption”:”Firewood foraged and cut from trees is stacked high on donkey-drawn carts in Sabuli Conservancy. Refugees from the nearby Dadaab refugee camp often bring donkey caravans into the protected areas to forage for firewood that they can sell. The journey by foot takes nearly one week, and they often hunt dik-dik and other small game to eat during their journey. Dadaab hosts more than 218,000 mostly Somali refugees who have fled conflict, drought, and famine in their country.”,”image”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.499267935578331,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/190e6556-78fa-451b-8960-85d2cda95d3b/MM9880_220307_05868.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/190e6556-78fa-451b-8960-85d2cda95d3b/MM9880_220307_05868_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/190e6556-78fa-451b-8960-85d2cda95d3b/MM9880_220307_05868_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/190e6556-78fa-451b-8960-85d2cda95d3b/MM9880_220307_05868_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/190e6556-78fa-451b-8960-85d2cda95d3b/MM9880_220307_05868_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/190e6556-78fa-451b-8960-85d2cda95d3b/MM9880_220307_05868_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/190e6556-78fa-451b-8960-85d2cda95d3b/MM9880_220307_05868_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/190e6556-78fa-451b-8960-85d2cda95d3b/MM9880_220307_05868_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/190e6556-78fa-451b-8960-85d2cda95d3b/MM9880_220307_05868″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/190e6556-78fa-451b-8960-85d2cda95d3b/MM9880_220307_05868.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ed Ram”,”dsc”:”Firewood foraged and cut from trees is stacked high on donkey drawn carts in Sabuli wildlife conservancy. Some refugees from the nearby Dadaab refugee camp bring donkey caravans into the protected areas to forage for firewood to sell. The journey by foot takes nearly one week, and they often hunt dik-dik and other small game to eat during their journey. Dadaab hosts more than 218,000 mostly Somali refugees who have fled conflict, drought, and famine in their country.”,”ext”:”jpg”},”align”:”pageWidth”,”belowParagraph”:true,”imageSrc”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/190e6556-78fa-451b-8960-85d2cda95d3b/MM9880_220307_05868_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358″,”size”:”medium”},”type”:”inline”},{“id”:”html48″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Kenya Wildlife Service rangers received the call in November of last year. Seven giraffes were stuck in the reservoir mud. Some were already dead, while others were too weak to pull themselves out. Rangers raced to the scene, but the remaining animals, frightened and in pain, died before they arrived.  “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html49″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Rangers hitched the dead giraffes to trucks and dragged their corpses out of the mud to prevent water contamination. They laid their bodies in a circle, a public statement about what climate change will do to the world’s wildlife unless humans take fast action.”},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html50″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”In total, more than 215 giraffes across the region died from drought between August 2021 and January of this year, Yussuf estimates. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”7fd5a4df-507e-4ce4-95c1-1783a51e6f92″,”cntnt”:{“cmsType”:”image”,”hasCopyright”:true,”id”:”7fd5a4df-507e-4ce4-95c1-1783a51e6f92″,”lines”:3,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showMore”:true,”caption”:”Ali Gedi, a goatherd, poses for a photo in the town of Eyrib in Sabuli Conservancy. Most of the town’s water reservoirs have dried up because of the drought. Elephants used to live here, but they left long ago, driven out by poaching and habitat destruction. “We won’t allow the same thing to happen to the giraffes,” Gedi says.”,”image”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:0.6669921875,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/8067acf4-7d41-475f-8115-c7fbeffff7b9/MM9880_220308_07469.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/8067acf4-7d41-475f-8115-c7fbeffff7b9/MM9880_220308_07469_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/8067acf4-7d41-475f-8115-c7fbeffff7b9/MM9880_220308_07469_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/8067acf4-7d41-475f-8115-c7fbeffff7b9/MM9880_220308_07469_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/8067acf4-7d41-475f-8115-c7fbeffff7b9/MM9880_220308_07469_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/8067acf4-7d41-475f-8115-c7fbeffff7b9/MM9880_220308_07469_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/8067acf4-7d41-475f-8115-c7fbeffff7b9/MM9880_220308_07469_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/8067acf4-7d41-475f-8115-c7fbeffff7b9/MM9880_220308_07469_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/8067acf4-7d41-475f-8115-c7fbeffff7b9/MM9880_220308_07469″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/8067acf4-7d41-475f-8115-c7fbeffff7b9/MM9880_220308_07469.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ed Ram”,”dsc”:”Ali Gedi, a 50-year-old goat herder and father of ten, poses for a photo in National Geographic’s portable outdoor studio in Eyrib town in Sabuli Conservancy. Eyrib, a town outside Wajir that depends on clean water from several large reservoirs built by the government back in the 1980s. But most of them have dried up because of the drought. Unable to find any other water, thirsty giraffes travel to drink from the small muddy puddles still left in the centre of the reservoirs. Gedi remembers the days before climate change ravaged this land. “I used to see elephants as a child,” he says. But the elephants left north-east Kenya long ago, driven out by poaching and habitat destruction, and the locals have suffered their loss. The elephants used to trample the brush with their massive flat feet, creating grasslands where goats and antelopes could graze side by side.”,”ext”:”jpg”},”align”:”contentWidth”,”belowParagraph”:true,”imageSrc”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/8067acf4-7d41-475f-8115-c7fbeffff7b9/MM9880_220308_07469_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358″,”size”:”small”},”type”:”inline”},{“id”:”html51″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”Some 30 hirola also died during that drought. Only about 500 of these shy and sensitive creatures remain in the world, so the deaths represented nearly six percent of the total population. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html52″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”“Nobody knows about the plight of the hirola,” says Ali, the world’s foremost expert on the hirola. “If they’re not charismatic, they’re not bringing money to the government through tourism, so no one will care.” “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html53″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”There have been some successful efforts by conservationists and the government to mitigate the damage being caused by climate change. Last September, three poachers were arrested with two cars full of giraffe meat as they headed to the Somali border crossing. They received a fast-tracked trial in Wajir, and two of them were sentenced to six years in prison, three years longer than the required sentence. For Yussuf, the verdict was a welcome one as he continues to fight on behalf of the wild animals who cannot fight for themselves. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html54″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”The day before he flies back to Nairobi, Yussuf meets with three men from other parts of Wajir county who want to start new conservancies. Jima Conservancy has been established as a community-based organization in the eastern part of the county, and the men are working to include it under the NECA umbrella. Yussuf sits with them for nearly two hours, talking them through each step they must take to successfully protect their land and the animals within. “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”html55″,”cntnt”:{“mrkup”:”“If you’re doing this for money, there’s no money,” Yussuf tells them. “We are doing this for future generations.” “},”type”:”p”},{“id”:”49ce6d1b-6fd0-40de-91b1-be70ab3e12fc”,”cntnt”:{“cmsType”:”image”,”hasCopyright”:true,”id”:”49ce6d1b-6fd0-40de-91b1-be70ab3e12fc”,”lines”:3,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showMore”:true,”caption”:”Two giraffes wait to cross the main road on the outskirts of Garissa, in search of water on the other side. This was once a widely used migration corridor, but now homes are popping up on either side of the main road as drought forces people to leave rural areas and move closer to the town. High concrete walls surround the road for long stretches, forcing giraffes to stray from their longstanding paths to find crossings.”,”image”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.499267935578331,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9351d2f8-4e0d-433b-99a1-196922774da3/MM9880_220306_04399.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9351d2f8-4e0d-433b-99a1-196922774da3/MM9880_220306_04399_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9351d2f8-4e0d-433b-99a1-196922774da3/MM9880_220306_04399_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9351d2f8-4e0d-433b-99a1-196922774da3/MM9880_220306_04399_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9351d2f8-4e0d-433b-99a1-196922774da3/MM9880_220306_04399_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9351d2f8-4e0d-433b-99a1-196922774da3/MM9880_220306_04399_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9351d2f8-4e0d-433b-99a1-196922774da3/MM9880_220306_04399_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9351d2f8-4e0d-433b-99a1-196922774da3/MM9880_220306_04399_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9351d2f8-4e0d-433b-99a1-196922774da3/MM9880_220306_04399″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9351d2f8-4e0d-433b-99a1-196922774da3/MM9880_220306_04399.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ed Ram”,”dsc”:”Griraffes wait to cross a road on the outskirts of Garissa town at dusk. Just outside Garissa town, homes are popping up on either side of the main road. Every evening, as the sun sets over the Tana River, giraffes travel from their grazing land in the east across the main road to drink water. What was once a traditional migration corridor has now been blocked off by high concrete walls, and the giraffes walk from plot to plot searching for a small opening. When they find one, they rush across the road in groups, wary of speeding cars and motorcycles.”,”ext”:”jpg”},”align”:”browserWidth”,”belowParagraph”:true,”imageSrc”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9351d2f8-4e0d-433b-99a1-196922774da3/MM9880_220306_04399_16x9.jpg?w=636&h=358″,”size”:”large”},”type”:”inline”}],”cid”:”drn:src:natgeo:unison::prod:c1238701-bbe3-4ce2-ac82-9d68f6594958″,”cntrbGrp”:[{“contributors”:[{“displayName”:”Neha Wadekar”}],”title”:”By”,”rl”:”Writer”},{“contributors”:[{“displayName”:”Ed Ram”}],”title”:”Photographs By”,”rl”:”Photographer”}],”mode”:”richtext”,”dtln”:”Wajir County, Kenya”,”enableAds”:true,”endbug”:true,”hsImmrsvLd”:true,”isMetered”:true,”isUserAuthed”:false,”mdDt”:”2022-05-03T13:15:23.809Z”,”readTime”:”25 min read”,”schma”:{“athrs”:[{“name”:”Neha Wadekar”}],”cnnicl”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/as-drought-worsens-can-kenyan-communities-coexist-with-native-wildlife”,”kywrds”:”grevy’s zebra, reticulated giraffe, community-led conservation”,”lg”:”https://assets-cdn.nationalgeographic.com/natgeo/static/default.NG.logo.dark.jpg”,”pblshr”:”National Geographic”,”abt”:”Giraffe”,”sclDsc”:”As prolonged drought plagues the Horn of Africa, some people perceive animals as a threat to scarce resources, while other communities rally to protect the creatures.”,”sclImg”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/d9144441-9db7-42f2-8c73-300da772e567/MM9880_220308_08084_16x9.jpg?w=1200″,”sclTtl”:”As drought worsens, can Kenyan communities coexist with native wildlife?”},”sctn”:”Animals”,”shrURLs”:{“fbIcon”:”facebook”,”fb”:”https://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nationalgeographic.com%2Fanimals%2Farticle%2Fas-drought-worsens-can-kenyan-communities-coexist-with-native-wildlife”,”fbAriaLabel”:”article.facebookShare.ariaLabel”,”fbLabel”:”article.facebookShare.label”,”fbButtonTracking”:{“event_name”:”share”,”share_content_type”:”article”,”content_title”:”as drought worsens, can kenyan communities coexist with native wildlife?”,”share_method”:”facebook”},”emailIcon”:”email__filled”,”email”:”mailto:?subject=As%20drought%20worsens%2C%20can%20Kenyan%20communities%20coexist%20with%20native%20wildlife%3F&body=As%20prolonged%20drought%20plagues%20the%20Horn%20of%20Africa%2C%20some%20people%20perceive%20animals%20as%20a%20threat%20to%20scarce%20resources%2C%20while%20other%20communities%20rally%20to%20protect%20the%20creatures.%0A%0Ahttps%3A%2F%2Fwww.nationalgeographic.com%2Fanimals%2Farticle%2Fas-drought-worsens-can-kenyan-communities-coexist-with-native-wildlife”,”emailLabel”:”Email”,”emailButtonTracking”:{“event_name”:”share”,”share_content_type”:”article”,”content_title”:”as drought worsens, can kenyan communities coexist with native wildlife?”,”share_method”:”email”},”twitter”:”https://twitter.com/intent/tweet?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nationalgeographic.com%2Fanimals%2Farticle%2Fas-drought-worsens-can-kenyan-communities-coexist-with-native-wildlife&text=As%20drought%20worsens%2C%20can%20Kenyan%20communities%20coexist%20with%20native%20wildlife%3F&via=NatGeo”,”twitterLabel”:”Tweet”,”twitterButtonTracking”:{“event_name”:”share”,”share_content_type”:”article”,”content_title”:”as drought worsens, can kenyan communities coexist with native wildlife?”,”share_method”:”twitter”}},”wrdcnt”:3152,”pbDt”:”2022-05-03T13:15:30.960Z”,”dt”:”2022-05-03T13:15:30.960Z”}]}],”cmsType”:”ArticleBodyFrame”},{“id”:”email-sticky-footer-frame1″},{“id”:”paywall-meter-frame1″},{“id”:”paywall-frame1″},{“id”:”natgeo-web-template-readthisnext-frame”,”mods”:[{“id”:”natgeo-web-template-readthisnext-module”,”cmsType”:”RecirculationGridModule”,”itemTruncate”:{“description”:4,”title”:4},”contentList”:[{“description”:”Wong Kim Ark battled nativists all the way to the Supreme Court. His 1898 victory established the definition of U.S. citizenship in a landmark decision.”,”img”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:0.90380859375,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1ebacddd-632b-4d48-ac1a-f2f204f3e87d/Profile3.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1ebacddd-632b-4d48-ac1a-f2f204f3e87d/Profile3_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1ebacddd-632b-4d48-ac1a-f2f204f3e87d/Profile3_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1ebacddd-632b-4d48-ac1a-f2f204f3e87d/Profile3_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1ebacddd-632b-4d48-ac1a-f2f204f3e87d/Profile3_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1ebacddd-632b-4d48-ac1a-f2f204f3e87d/Profile3_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1ebacddd-632b-4d48-ac1a-f2f204f3e87d/Profile3_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1ebacddd-632b-4d48-ac1a-f2f204f3e87d/Profile3_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1ebacddd-632b-4d48-ac1a-f2f204f3e87d/Profile3″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1ebacddd-632b-4d48-ac1a-f2f204f3e87d/Profile3.jpg”,”altText”:”An ID photograph of Wong Kim Ark was taken prior to an 1894 voyage to China.”,”crdt”:”Tango Images/Alamy”,”dsc”:”An ID photograph of Wong Kim Ark was taken prior to an 1894 voyage to China.”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”Wong Kim Ark”,”ratio”:”3×2″},”isFeatured”:true,”sections”:[{“name”:”History Magazine”,”id”:”9e8034f6-2e16-3b86-998b-56f8ff9dffb7″,”type”:”sources”,”uri”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/magazine”}],”headline”:”This American’s Supreme Court fight defined U.S. citizenship”,”link”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/history-magazine/article/this-americans-supreme-court-fight-defined-us-citizenship”},{“description”:”The Philippines is home to some of the world’s most active users of social media. As election day approaches, the platform has been “weaponized” to get a former dictator’s son to the presidency.”,”img”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.499267935578331,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/3201c60c-7a52-4a54-b545-713a1f431435/MM9900_220402_04863.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/3201c60c-7a52-4a54-b545-713a1f431435/MM9900_220402_04863_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/3201c60c-7a52-4a54-b545-713a1f431435/MM9900_220402_04863_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/3201c60c-7a52-4a54-b545-713a1f431435/MM9900_220402_04863_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/3201c60c-7a52-4a54-b545-713a1f431435/MM9900_220402_04863_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/3201c60c-7a52-4a54-b545-713a1f431435/MM9900_220402_04863_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/3201c60c-7a52-4a54-b545-713a1f431435/MM9900_220402_04863_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/3201c60c-7a52-4a54-b545-713a1f431435/MM9900_220402_04863_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/3201c60c-7a52-4a54-b545-713a1f431435/MM9900_220402_04863″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/3201c60c-7a52-4a54-b545-713a1f431435/MM9900_220402_04863.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Hannah Reyes Morales, National Geographic”,”dsc”:”Supporters of Ferdinand Marcos Jr. are seen during a campaign rally in Tarlac, Philippines. According to political analysts, he has been the candidate who has benefited the most from disinformation online.”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”MM9900_220402_04863″},”sections”:[{“name”:”History & Culture”,”id”:”b0c8dd52-23a8-34c0-a940-f46792bc9e70″,”type”:”sources”,”uri”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history”}],”headline”:”Where social media is successfully rewriting an autocratic past”,”link”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/article/in-this-country-social-media-is-successfully-rewriting-an-autocratic-past”},{“description”:”Billions of dollars hinge on forests soaking up CO2 for decades to come. What happens when drought and fire kill the trees?”,”img”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.499267935578331,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e30e3141-568e-4e10-b3cf-b6ef019848d1/001_GettyImages-1233451540.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e30e3141-568e-4e10-b3cf-b6ef019848d1/001_GettyImages-1233451540_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e30e3141-568e-4e10-b3cf-b6ef019848d1/001_GettyImages-1233451540_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e30e3141-568e-4e10-b3cf-b6ef019848d1/001_GettyImages-1233451540_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e30e3141-568e-4e10-b3cf-b6ef019848d1/001_GettyImages-1233451540_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e30e3141-568e-4e10-b3cf-b6ef019848d1/001_GettyImages-1233451540_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e30e3141-568e-4e10-b3cf-b6ef019848d1/001_GettyImages-1233451540_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e30e3141-568e-4e10-b3cf-b6ef019848d1/001_GettyImages-1233451540_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e30e3141-568e-4e10-b3cf-b6ef019848d1/001_GettyImages-1233451540″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/e30e3141-568e-4e10-b3cf-b6ef019848d1/001_GettyImages-1233451540.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Max Whittaker, Bloomberg, Getty Images”,”dsc”:”A seedling next to the stump of a tree harvested after being burned by the 2014 King Fire on timber company land adjacent to the Eldorado National Forest near Georgetown, California, U.S., on Monday, June 7, 2021. As the threat of wildfire looms, a debate has emerged in California about the best way to plant trees.”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”01 CO2 forest”},”sections”:[{“name”:”Environment”,”id”:”623ce370-3e67-3fb2-b9a5-070ceb9b2de5″,”type”:”sources”,”uri”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment”}],”headline”:”Forests as ‘carbon offsets’? Climate change has other plans.”,”link”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/forests-as-carbon-offsets-climate-change-has-other-plans”},{“description”:”The larger-than-life composition is mostly invisible to the naked eye. Advanced technology helped uncover the stunning composition.”,”img”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:0.66650390625,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/dd11dfd5-ea93-433a-94c4-01ec16f142a3/Phantom_Combineds.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/dd11dfd5-ea93-433a-94c4-01ec16f142a3/Phantom_Combineds_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/dd11dfd5-ea93-433a-94c4-01ec16f142a3/Phantom_Combineds_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/dd11dfd5-ea93-433a-94c4-01ec16f142a3/Phantom_Combineds_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/dd11dfd5-ea93-433a-94c4-01ec16f142a3/Phantom_Combineds_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/dd11dfd5-ea93-433a-94c4-01ec16f142a3/Phantom_Combineds_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/dd11dfd5-ea93-433a-94c4-01ec16f142a3/Phantom_Combineds_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/dd11dfd5-ea93-433a-94c4-01ec16f142a3/Phantom_Combineds_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/dd11dfd5-ea93-433a-94c4-01ec16f142a3/Phantom_Combineds”,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/dd11dfd5-ea93-433a-94c4-01ec16f142a3/Phantom_Combineds.jpg”,”altText”:”A figure drawn on a cave ceiling in Alabama.”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Stephen Alvarez; Illustration by Jan Simek”,”dsc”:”More than six feet tall, a mud glyph, (outlined in black), drawn on the ceiling of the 19th Unnamed Cave in Alabama, is among the largest discovered in North America and could be more than a 1,000 years old. Lines extending from the top of the figure’s head resemble feathers, and it holds a round object—a rattle or weapon.”,”ext”:”jpg”},”sections”:[{“name”:”History & Culture”,”id”:”b0c8dd52-23a8-34c0-a940-f46792bc9e70″,”type”:”sources”,”uri”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history”}],”headline”:”3D scans reveal largest cave art in North America”,”link”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/article/3d-scans-reveal-largest-cave-art-in-north-america”}],”headline”:”Read This Next”}],”cmsType”:”EnhancedFrame”},{“id”:”natgeo-globalpromo-ad-frame1″,”mods”:[{“id”:”natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-ad”,”cmsType”:”StackModule”,”align”:”left”,”edgs”:[{“id”:”natgeo-globalpromo-ad-tile”,”cmsType”:”AdTile”,”pos”:”infinitefeed”}]}],”cmsType”:”EnhancedFrame”},{“id”:”natgeo-globalpromo-frame1″,”fullWidth”:true,”mods”:[{“id”:”natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-headline”,”cmsType”:”StackModule”,”align”:”left”,”edgs”:[{“id”:”natgeo-globalpromo-headline-tile”,”cmsType”:”HeadlineTile”,”heading”:”Go Further”}]},{“id”:”natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-animals”,”cmsType”:”CarouselModule”,”centerHeading”:true,”edgs”:[{“id”:”natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-animals-tile”,”cmsType”:”RegularStandardPrismTile”,”cId”:”natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-animals-tile_c66bb23a-afe9-475b-a317-e9cf497ab894″,”description”:”These critically endangered marine mammals have enough genetic diversity to recover if fishers switch to sustainable gear. That’s a big if.”,”ctas”:[{“url”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/vaquita-porpoises-could-genetically-recover-if-fishing-ends”,”text”:”natgeo.ctaText.read”,”icon”:”article”}],”img”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.4998742770932865,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/6a8ec195-3936-4cd6-96e1-a6b4a30cbdfc/GettyImages-1239768076.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/6a8ec195-3936-4cd6-96e1-a6b4a30cbdfc/GettyImages-1239768076_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/6a8ec195-3936-4cd6-96e1-a6b4a30cbdfc/GettyImages-1239768076_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/6a8ec195-3936-4cd6-96e1-a6b4a30cbdfc/GettyImages-1239768076_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/6a8ec195-3936-4cd6-96e1-a6b4a30cbdfc/GettyImages-1239768076_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/6a8ec195-3936-4cd6-96e1-a6b4a30cbdfc/GettyImages-1239768076_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/6a8ec195-3936-4cd6-96e1-a6b4a30cbdfc/GettyImages-1239768076_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/6a8ec195-3936-4cd6-96e1-a6b4a30cbdfc/GettyImages-1239768076_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/6a8ec195-3936-4cd6-96e1-a6b4a30cbdfc/GettyImages-1239768076″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/6a8ec195-3936-4cd6-96e1-a6b4a30cbdfc/GettyImages-1239768076.jpg”,”altText”:”Picture of a mural painting of an adult vaquita with a vaquita calf.”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Guillermo Arias/AFP via Getty Images”,”dsc”:”View of a mural depicting a vaquita porpoise in downtown San Felipe, in the Gulf of California, Baja California state, northwestern, Mexico, on March 31, 2022, during the Milagro (Miracle) operation of the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society and Mexican authorities to save the critically endangered vaquita porpoise. – Mexico’s navy and the environmental organization Sea Shepherd are working together to prevent the vaquita porpoise disappearing forever. The species is critically endangered, due to illegal gillnets used to catch totoaba, a large fish whose swim bladder can fetch thousands of dollars in China thanks to its supposed medicinal properties. The navy stepped up surveillance in January amid criticism from the United States that Mexico was not doing enough to protect the vaquita, the smallest porpoise on the planet.”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”Vaquita_Mural_Lead”},”abstract”:”These critically endangered marine mammals have enough genetic diversity to recover if fishers switch to sustainable gear. 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Coyote Hunt. Each year, the Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs of Sullivan County sponsors a Coyote Killing Contest in NY State. The three-day competition was held from February 4th-6th, 2022 and was headquartered at the White Sulphur Springs Fire House. The contest is open to coyote hunters across the state, along those from six counties in Pennsylvania (Pike, Susquehanna, Wayne, Lackawanna, Monroe and Tioga). Among the prizes offered are a $2,000 check for the hunter who turns in the heaviest coyote. 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As the threat of wildfire looms, a debate has emerged in California about the best way to plant trees.”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”01 CO2 forest”},”abstract”:”Billions of dollars hinge on forests soaking up CO2 for decades to come. What happens when drought and fire kill the trees?”,”title”:”Forests as ‘carbon offsets’? Climate change has other plans.”,”tags”:[{“name”:”Environment”,”id”:”623ce370-3e67-3fb2-b9a5-070ceb9b2de5″,”type”:”sources”,”uri”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment”}]},{“id”:”natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile”,”cmsType”:”RegularStandardPrismTile”,”cId”:”natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile_4ab47837-09fd-47f5-8bdb-5dbfabfb9126″,”description”:”If not slowed, climate change over the next few centuries could lead to marine losses unlike anything Earth has seen in 252 million years, says a new study.”,”ctas”:[{“url”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/mass-extinction-in-oceans-can-be-avoided-by-curbing-fossil-fuels”,”text”:”natgeo.ctaText.read”,”icon”:”article”}],”img”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.5025678650036685,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fc825960-6768-4168-82fa-13e7b6f79043/NationalGeographic_2743527.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fc825960-6768-4168-82fa-13e7b6f79043/NationalGeographic_2743527_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fc825960-6768-4168-82fa-13e7b6f79043/NationalGeographic_2743527_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fc825960-6768-4168-82fa-13e7b6f79043/NationalGeographic_2743527_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fc825960-6768-4168-82fa-13e7b6f79043/NationalGeographic_2743527_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fc825960-6768-4168-82fa-13e7b6f79043/NationalGeographic_2743527_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fc825960-6768-4168-82fa-13e7b6f79043/NationalGeographic_2743527_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fc825960-6768-4168-82fa-13e7b6f79043/NationalGeographic_2743527_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fc825960-6768-4168-82fa-13e7b6f79043/NationalGeographic_2743527″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/fc825960-6768-4168-82fa-13e7b6f79043/NationalGeographic_2743527.jpg”,”altText”:”A sea turtle swims above coral whit small yellow and orange fish swimming around”,”crdt”:”Photograph by David Doubilet, Nat Geo Image Collection”,”dsc”:”A sea turtle swims above coral in Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park.”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”ocean-warming-coral”},”abstract”:”If not slowed, climate change over the next few centuries could lead to marine losses unlike anything Earth has seen in 252 million years, says a new study.”,”title”:”Mass extinction in oceans can be avoided by curbing fossil fuels”,”tags”:[{“name”:”Environment”,”id”:”623ce370-3e67-3fb2-b9a5-070ceb9b2de5″,”type”:”sources”,”uri”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment”}]},{“id”:”natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile”,”cmsType”:”RegularStandardPrismTile”,”cId”:”natgeo-globalpromo-frame1-history-tile_e876e057-b15b-4e1e-a79c-e05da471e36c”,”description”:”From sequoias to cherry blossoms, the National Geographic archives record a long love affair with trees.”,”ctas”:[{“url”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/unique-trees-from-nat-geos-photo-archives-mark-amazing-moments”,”text”:”natgeo.ctaText.read”,”icon”:”article”}],”img”:{“crps”:[{“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.4291695743196091,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/64814381-2202-4ebb-9065-19aa9a925445/007_NationalGeographic_603039.jpg”},{“nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/64814381-2202-4ebb-9065-19aa9a925445/007_NationalGeographic_603039_16x9.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/64814381-2202-4ebb-9065-19aa9a925445/007_NationalGeographic_603039_3x2.jpg”},{“nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/64814381-2202-4ebb-9065-19aa9a925445/007_NationalGeographic_603039_square.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/64814381-2202-4ebb-9065-19aa9a925445/007_NationalGeographic_603039_2x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/64814381-2202-4ebb-9065-19aa9a925445/007_NationalGeographic_603039_3x4.jpg”},{“nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/64814381-2202-4ebb-9065-19aa9a925445/007_NationalGeographic_603039_4x3.jpg”},{“nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/64814381-2202-4ebb-9065-19aa9a925445/007_NationalGeographic_603039_2x1.jpg”}],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/64814381-2202-4ebb-9065-19aa9a925445/007_NationalGeographic_603039″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/64814381-2202-4ebb-9065-19aa9a925445/007_NationalGeographic_603039.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Eliza R. 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